Was the Wheel in Ezekiel Real?


In our previous newsletter (Vol. 10, No. 3) we described how four medical doctors libelously labeled Samson (Judges 13-16) as having an Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD). One of the four medical doctors responsible for saddling Samson with the ASPD label has now pilloried the prophet Ezekiel with a nonsensical neurological nosology (systematic classification of disease). According to an article in The New Scientist (Vol. 172, No. 2317, p. 20), Eric Altschuler "says that records in the Bible reveal that Ezekiel, who lived about 2600 years ago, showed extreme classic symptoms of temporal lobe epilepsy." The article reveals Altschuler’s findings as follows:

Neurologically Ezekiel displayed some obvious signs of epilepsy, such as frequent fainting spells and episodes of not being able to speak.

The Biblical figure, who chronicled the fall of Jerusalem in 586 BC, exhibited other peculiarities associated with the disease. For instance, he wrote compulsively, a trait known as hypergraphia. Altschuler points out that the Book of Ezekiel is the fourth longest in the Bible—only slightly shorter than Genesis. "It’s impenetrable," he says. "He goes on and on."

Ezekiel was also extremely religious, another characteristic associated with this form of epilepsy. While many Biblical figures are pious, none was as aggressively religious as Ezekiel, says Altschuler. Other signs of epilepsy can include aggression, delusions and pedantic speech—and the man had them all (p. 20).

Altschuler et al. have already shown disrespect for Samson (a Judge of Israel and listed among the examples of faith in Hebrews 11) by considering him a psychiatric case and slamming him with the DSM label ASPD. Now Altschuler adds insult to injury against the Bible by explaining away the prophet Ezekiel’s divine calling by describing his work as "extreme classic symptoms of temporal lobe epilepsy."

Altschuler claims to have seen something significant in Ezekiel, but his lack of faith in the Bible and in its divine inspiration blinds him to the truth, and so he must turn to nonsensical neurological myths to understand the complexity of Ezekiel. Altschuler provides one more example of the contrast between the wisdom of men and the Word of God and one more example of the foolishness of the worldly-wise.

PAL V10N4 (July-August 2002)


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